Sunday, October 25, 2009

We watched After Hours last night

And if After Hours is your favorite movie, you need to examine your life. This means you, Nathan Rabin.

27 comments:

  1. What can you say about After Hours than: Why don't you start walking uptown, Asshole?!

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  2. I guess getting wet is worse than being hounded by a vigilante mob. Also, was there even a script or was the whole thing ad-libbed? It's hard to believe anyone would bother writing down lines that bad.

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  3. Oh, and Martin Scorsese hates/is afraid of women. But that's a given.

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  4. Really??? What do you like about it?

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  5. i thought it was funny. i like those kind of comedies where there's a chain reaction of events that get worse and worse. it would make a great double feature with "adventures in babysitting" starring elisabeth shue. plus there's my nostalgia for 80s new york. and i thought the writing was good.

    i actually wrote about it on my blog a while ago: http://mattcozart.blogspot.com/2009/04/scorseses-after-hours.html

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  6. I was thinking that of the 80s "I had a really bad night" genre, Adventures in Babysitting really kicks it in the pants.

    I get that it's a "dark" comedy but I found it far more boring than dark. Also I think the comedy-from-frustration thing gets to me. Like a lot of Seinfeld episodes, I just feel exasperated.

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  7. i think it gets to me too, but in a good way :)

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  8. This is one of my favorite movies--and I hate everything about the 80s, including myself in the 80s.

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  9. Wow, a culture divided...

    Actually some of my favorite movies are from the 80s: Short Cuts, The Big Chill, Amadeus, Stand By Me ... not even getting into the teen flicks.

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  10. robert altman's Short Cuts? that was 1993.

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  11. ha! why did I think that was from the 80s? must have been Matthew Modine.

    This is just more evidence for my theory that decades divide better along the 5's. ergo, 1993 was still basically the 80s.

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  12. decades are in reality about 15 years long. (they overlap.)

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  13. how many decades are we in right now, I wonder?

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  14. two, but not the two you think. we are currently in the '90s and the 'teens. the aughts were skipped, either from laziness, fatigue, or a kind of "writer's block" on the part of Fate. with the election of obama, the ascension of o'brien, and the recent "summer of death" re past-their-prime celebrities, the 'teens have verily begun.

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  15. strange! i watched it 2 nights ago. i liked it, but not as much as i did the several times i saw it in the '80's. it's definitely a male-fantasy kind of movie. the nerdy office worker and the Wild Chick. An '80's staple theme, now that i think about it: Something Wild, Diva, Brazil, Body Heat, etc. Story of my fucking life in the '90's too. Hm.

    i was intrigued by the archeological vision of Soho as a still-edgy-then locale, and consumed by jealousy for all the past-2AM public goings-on.

    I like the way Scorsese as a director honors every moment. All the dramatic closeups (the various key hand-offs come to mind) and the unexpected sudden pans (paul's foreshadowing, wary eye on the sculpture as Marcy whisks him out of the loft) really keep you locked down. In the first part of the movie Griffin Dunne's balletic facial muscles do a great job of recording, in fine detail, the moment-to-moment battle between his libido and his essential disdain for Downtown, like an accent that keeps popping out.

    I guess when the movie went off the rails for me was when he suddenly snaps at Marcy, deciding she's a little too nuts. I didn't buy it. I was like, dude, roll with it, she's a freaking babe. Sort of lost respect for him after that and the movie got a little dull. More than I remember. Plus I tend to get obsessed with plot details along the lines of what @Christen said so that was distracting.

    All the supporting actors were enjoyable bright spots. John Heard as the bartender did a great job of being menacing by being nice. The nicer he got, the scarier he got. Every time he stopped talking without decking Paul, I breathed a sigh of relief. Teri Garr was a joy to watch, although those scenes just perpetuated my disappointment with Paul's lack of sex drive. I was like, is she supposed to be not hot or something? The gay dude was freaking brilliant - kind of walking the same tightrope as early movie paul - teetering between shyness and raw desire, peering cautiously over his mom glasses.

    In the end I was left with a feeling of appreciating the Scorsese filmic mastery and joy of storytelling but feeling that the really harsh, deadly emotions and images that i tend to like seeing on screen were shied away from. I guess in the end the film is about Paul's revulsion for the female body, which is something that's hard for me to get engaged with.

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  16. The gay dude was the best actor in the movie. Most of the bit part people, I like them in other movies but here I felt they were forced into implausible roles and poorly directed. Rosanna Arquette is adorable but surely that's the basis of her career. Has she been in a good movie? Just Pulp Fiction apparently. Her IMDB page has over 100 entries and they're all crap! Poor Rosanna.

    But your take is interesting. Maybe it's a movie only a man can appreciate. All the Scorcese moments seem wasted when the movie itself is so banal.

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  17. Desperately Seeking Susan <3 - another nerd/wild chick movie, but the nerd is a girl in that one!

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  18. Another shitty movie that exists mostly as a cultural reference. :)

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  19. Both After Hours and DSS were films that set a zeitgeist for 80s "hipster" (not called that then) malaise, one I remember very well. At the time I don't think it mattered to anyone whether they were good in any conventional sense. They had a mood and style that people liked, and they were considered "cool" although not THAT cool, actually. Of course, little dates worse than a somewhat mainstream stab at the style of yesterday's too-cool-for-it-all malaise hung on a weak story line.

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  20. Sigh...I love when poets talk about movies. Hehe, jk. Luv u guyz.

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  21. this reminds of something i've been wanting to mention to you, elisa. have you seen those new levi's ads with the poetry and spooky art-kids-wilding imagery? i'll just come out and say i love them. and i like the poetry. something rhapsodic about Pioneers! Oh Pioneers!. i should probably be able to identify it, i bet you can...

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  22. No, I haven't ... are they on YouTube?

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  23. yes! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAXpJSvW5mA

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  24. Pioneers O Pioneers is Walt Whitman.

    I'm always a bit skeptical when a brand tries to attach itself to some kind of political statement. Like wearing Levi's = what, independent thinking? Going boldly where others dare not go, etc.? Seems Apple-esque. I'm an old-fashioned "sex sells" kind of girl myself, I guess. Leave the politics outta it.

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