Monday, July 25, 2011

Things that happened this weekend

  • I learned an excellent medical term, mal de debarquement -- basically, land sickness. My friend Walt recently experienced it following a cruise. Dibs on this title for a poetry book. (I love French terms for illness, e.g., grand mal and petite mal, which can fairly be translated as "big bad" and "little bad.")
  • I packed up about 2/3 of my perfume collection. I'm going to try to wear samples over the next few weeks so I have fewer to transport.
  • I ate a hot dog and a slider-sized cheeseburger, both sans le bun of course. The last time I consumed either foodstuff was probably 2004. (As an update to this post, I'm becoming inured to the taste/texture of meat.)
  • Coming soon, by request: an Introduction to Linguistics post. 'Twill probably be half-assed and out of date. (I'll accept crowdsourced corrections.)

14 comments:

  1. Has the French Exit been translated into French? What is the French for French Exit? (As a non-French-speaker I would be tempted to translate debarquement as disboating a la deplaning. I have rarely suffered Deplaning Disease.)

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  2. Good question. Surely it's not le sortie Francaise; we don't call football American football.

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  3. Sortie Anglaise probably works better, by analogy w/ "French letter," "French disease," etc.

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  4. Are hot dogs actually meat? I thought they were sui generis/

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  5. My thinking is that the French phrase for "French Exit" would by "Entree pour sortie."

    My reasoning is that in film production the English phrase (or maybe it's specifically American) "Day for night" is, in French, "Nuit americaine." (My source of this is Truffaut's film "Day for Night" -- the French name of the film is "Nuit americaine," and the question also comes up at one point in the film dialogue.)

    Ergo, "French Exit" would be, in French, "Entree pour sortie."

    BTW, I don't speak French. Hee hee :)

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  6. What is a "french exit" anyway? I was wondering how I would translate that if I ever translated your book (as I tend to do when I read a book).

    As for "grand/petit mal," I would actually translate "mal" with "ailment."

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  7. Yeah, I know, "mal" really means like a sickness but that's not as funny.

    A French exit is when you leave without saying goodbye.

    It would be RAD if you translated my book Franscois. I trust you!

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  8. I know I misspelled your name just then. Must have been my brain trying to essify the C ...

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  9. O_O Did you just make me the Cole Swensen of our generation? In two languages?

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  10. We're all DYING to know how you will translate the title!

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  11. "Partir à l'anglaise" or "Filer en douce." Your pick.

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  12. http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=362003

    suggests 'filer a l'anglaise' is an option too

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  13. i think 80% of the exits i've ever made were french exits--goodbyes are so awkward!

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  14. I was semi-tempted to French exit out of Boston. The big goodbyes are the worst. They always mean more to one party than the other. It sucks when you want to get huggy and cry-y and the other person's like, See ya!

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