Thursday, April 12, 2012

A poem and some funny things

I have a new poem in The Rumpus today, called "Semi-Aubade" (sorry, B, I had to name it at the last minute). It's part of the National Poetry Month feature. Here's the full line-up. I especially liked Jennifer Chang's poem from a couple of days ago ("Or: the wave-stressed shore, the shore queening its pale strand over the world’s erosion").

Kathy's latest post up at the PoFo blog ("Contents: One Acme Poem-Making Kit") reminded me of this old Coyote and Roadrunner cartoon, "Beep Prepared" (the short is packaged up with Splendor in the Grass, a super-weird movie in which Natalie Wood goes insane in a setting outside of space-time as we know it). The sequence between 1:24 and 2:19 is especially wonderful:



Also, as long as I'm posting shorts, this is super hilarious:

13 comments:

  1. "Beep Prepared" is the kind of thing that makes me wish the PoFo allowed comments on Harriet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hate that they don't allow comments.

      Delete
  2. BAHAHAHAHAHA! Good going, E! I totally respected you up to this moment. ;) <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Respect: pretty overrated, I've realized.

      Delete
  3. What I love about those road runner and coyote cartoons is how the coyote never runs out of new ways to blow himself up. Coyote stands by the road with a simple net, waiting to throw it on the road runner; road runner comes zooming up the road and goes flying right through the net (with the inevitable "beep-beep"), the net never touches him and he sails on away; the coyote examines the net for any defect, looking at it six different ways, and as he does, he somehow wraps the net around himself and suddenly he can't move; he starts hopping around, trying to get loose from the net; and the vibrations from his hopping shake loose a boulder that falls on him and smacks him flat.

    There's one of the cartoons where the coyote goes through the usual business, falling off several cliffs, getting carried down a river and over a waterfall, explodes himself and he goes flying into the air, bangs into a rock overhang and goes bump-bump-bump down a slope where a train rams right into him and sends him flying, and he lands at the very edge of a cliff, but doesn't fall over the edge. The coyote stands there, panting, eyes wide in shell-shock, and the road runner comes zooming up behind him and screeches to a halt. The bird stands there for a minute blinking, then he holds up a sign that says "I just don't have the heart." And the cartoon ends.

    I really like Splendor in the Grass. I guess "weird" might be a way to describe it, though truthfully in the sort of small town where the movie takes place, and in the time period when it takes place, people often really were as suffocated and repressed and insane as the people in the movie. The movie does seem to me a little longer than it needs to be, and sometimes I feel the heavy drama of it banging down with iron feet in the background, a little overdone. (Elia Kazan directed it.) But I mostly like it.

    Interesting to think of it in comparison with Rebel Without a Cause, which I like somewhat better, a tighter more coherent story maybe. Oh, the plague of movies of alienated youth of those years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What's weird to me about SITG is how the details seem so wedded to the year it was made (1961) rather than the year it's supposed to take place (1928). I didn't dislike it, I was just sort of distracted by the way that was handled.

      Delete
    2. Interesting (regarding Spendor in the Grass). What details in particular, if you don't mind giving a couple of for-instances, if anything comes to mind?

      Delete
    3. This was a while ago so I can't remember any specific details. I just thought the clothes, for example, looked more '50s than '20s.

      Delete
  4. I haven't seen SITG in a long time--I saw it on TV when I was like 12 or 13--but what's 50s about it to me is the Freudian stuff, the repressed sexuality that simmers in other 50s flicks like A Streetcar Named Desire and Suddenly, Last Summer. And the resultant psychopathology. And it may not be particularly 50s to have Natalie Wood recite the eponymous Wordsworth lines in her head, but it seems old-fashioned. Say what? Splenda in the glass? It's like all those old books with Shakespearian titles--Steinbeck's The Moon Is Down, Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Splenda! How did I never notice it's someone saying "splendor" with a Long Island accent?

      Delete
  5. I had a dream I was telling someone about your poem! I said gleefully to them: "And it's called 'Semi-Aubade'!"

    ReplyDelete