Sunday, August 12, 2012

The Sundays

We've now been in Denver for almost a year -- we moved into our apartment on August 20, 2011 -- but despite knowing a lot of people, I still feel like an outsider sometimes. I think I can attribute this to two causes, aside from the obvious truth that it takes time to feel at home in a new city: 1) The vast majority of writers in town are involved in academia somehow, either as students or teachers or both (with MFA and PhD programs in both Denver and Boulder). I'm apart from all that. And 2) I'm not on Facebook. I never felt that opting out of Facebook hurt my social life in Boston, but here it really seems to. I'm less visible. I'm half a person! I also read recently that employers assume people who aren't on Facebook must be psychotic or otherwise have something atrocious to hide. Great.

Things that are good: I'm writing a lot, almost every day. I bought new glasses, for the first time since 2005. Well, right now they're just frames, with fake lenses. I'm tempted to just wear them, over my contacts. (NOT OKAY, RIGHT?) I'm also working on a play -- not writing but acting in one. John is directing it and I'm playing the female lead. This is insane! It is a very bizarre and difficult part and I am not a pilot. This is mostly good but also kind of bad because sometimes I get so frustrated and embarrassed by it I want to collapse to the earth and weep. Also, I don't seem to get hangovers anymore.

Things that are bad: Oh, you know. Loneliness. Lack of hangovers aside, one can't deny we're getting older and flabbier all the time. John lost some of his classes, which was very bad, but then he found new ones at the last minute, which is good.

With romantic relationships, the early falling-in-love stage is arguably the best part, but with friendships, the early stages are a drag. I don't want to have to woo new friends for a year. I want to be old friends, instantly! Complete trust!

12 comments:

  1. As a person who has sometimes aspired to be a wannabe actor, I support this endeavor of yours and predict its success. (Be sure to youtube it when the time comes:)





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    1. I did some acting in junior high and high school but not since then. This is a pretty crazy play to try to get back into it with. Really long monologues, heavy material, etc.

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  2. how do the employers know you aren't on facebook? can't you make like your profile not come up on searches etc?

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    1. Can you do that? Anyway I'm guessing the assumption here is that even if you have a profile but everything's locked down, you must have something to hide.

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  3. Can you link to that employer/FB article? No matter what it says, you will always be a whole person to me.

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    1. Thanks yo. Here it is: http://mashable.com/2012/08/07/no-facebook-psychopath/

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  4. It's brave to try acting again. The summer between my junior and senior years of high school, I was in a theatre group (sponsored by Minneapolis and St. Paul schools) that produced live theatre shows for grade-school age kids. It was really more or less a theatre class, though we did create and stage shows for kids audiences for several weeks.

    As a kind of practice exercise we did a rough staged reading of Ionesco's one-act play "The Leader," and I read the lead part. The only audience for that were the other students in theatre group, not a "real" audience, and that's the sum total of my acting experience. (During the actual staged productions I did mostly backstage stuff.)

    We did other basic theatre training exercises, improvisational stuff, self-awareness and sense memory, yoga-ish things to help with concentration, and we worked a lot on breathing (i.e. projecting). At that point in my life I'd been writing poems for a couple of years, and the breathing/projecting work and some of the other theatre training things helped me a lot with reading my poems to audiences -- prior to the theatre summer, I mostly was too shy to read my poems to groups of people. I learned things that summer that I still find useful now when I'm doing a poem reading.

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    1. Man, I don't even want to think about projection yet. It's hard enough to worry about getting the lines right and saying them in a plausible, natural way at the same time...

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    2. Yeah, one of the reasons I didn't try to pursue acting was that I didn't want to deal with learning/memorizing lines. Of course it's not just dry memorization, it's all wrapped up in the character you're playing, it's the character saying the lines, etc. But I just didn't want to deal with all of that. I was more interested in writing my own lines (i.e. poems) and reading those. Go figure.

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  5. What's Boulder like? It seems like Boulder is a kind of combo of Silicon Valley and Austin, in the mountains. Or maybe not. Not having been there, I really don't know, but it seems interesting that a kind of sleepy, hippy Colorado town is now much more popular.

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    1. I don't much about Silicon Valley, but it's a lot like Austin -- super yuppie, hippie, and douchey in equal parts. But in a more beautiful natural setting than Austin, I think, with the mountains. Also much more compact.

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