Monday, September 24, 2012

Brunch music

"Brunch music" is a term I think I invented, a genre that includes pretty, mellow, and slightly melancholy music that seems perfectly suited to drinking warm coffee while a cool breeze comes through the window and somebody makes you eggs. When I say this term in my mind, I always think of the poet Emily Frey, whom I spent a lot of time with when we both lived in Boston a while back, and whose CD collection is especially strong in brunch music.

Incidentally, my favorite brunches always occur when I'm hosting out-of-town guests, or I'm visiting friends in another city, and we've stayed up too late talking and sipping whiskey or red wine, and the combination of a mild hangover and a caffeine buzz creates a mood that is both lazy and giddy. That makes me so happy. (I also really like eggs.)

Here are some songs that qualify:




You see what I mean? Other "brunch music classics" include Red House Painters and Beth Orton.

11 comments:

  1. Ever heard of a book from the early 80s called The Official Preppie Handbook? I picked up a copy at a library book sale. It harps on drinking Bloody Marys at brunch, something I haven't tried. Bloody Marys and croissants.

    For "brunch music"--that's a brilliant coinage, actually, that should be a section in a music store--I'd play Nick Drake's Pink Moon. Suzanne Vega's first album. Carole King's Rhymes and Reasons...no I don't have time for this.

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    1. For most of my youth I thought Bloody Marys sounded utterly disgusting. Then suddenly in my 20s they seemed like a great idea. I still love them (with tons of spicy stuff and pickled crap) but I don't really drink them anymore because a glass full of tomato acid in the morning doesn't sit so well with this old stomach.

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    2. Oh, and Nick Drake and Suzanne Vega are definitely brunch music.

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  2. The Decemberists, Keane, Corinne Bailey Rae, Regina Spektor...I wish they'd play more Yacht Rock.

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  3. Camera Obscura would be good brunch music. I heard them for the first time while driving through northern Michigan country; they were playing live and unplugged in a public radio studio. Melancholy songs like "Tears for Affairs" sounded even more melancholy in that venue than in the recordings, and they were interspersed with conversation with Tracyanne Campbell, who sounded like a sensitive person with a charming Glaswegian accent. The songs intertwined with the pines flanking the road.

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  4. We listen to a lot of Gene Vincent and Johnny Cash when we're making brunch at home...

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  5. Carole King's album "Tapestry." Any number of albums by Joan Baez. Pretty much any album by Gillian Welch. Joni Mitchell's album "Ladies of the Canyon." Pablo Casals playing J.S. Bach's Suites for Solo Cello (there are six of the suites total). Sharon Isbin or Andres Segovia playing classical guitar pieces. Julian Bream playing Renaissance lute music. (Also, the Julian Bream Consort playing Renaissance music for small ensemble.) Mason William's album "Classical Gas." Mark O'Connor's album "Soppin' the Gravy."

    A few off the top of my head.

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    1. Tapestry is great and perfectly brunchy, but I think it unjustly overshadows its immediate successor, Rhymes and Reasons. Beautiful mellowancholy songs on that. Check out "I Think I Can Hear You":

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DRT_E2x1_E

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  6. Spot on with "Amy". The plaintive "Do you still love me?" is my Pavlovian trigger for more pancakes.

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  7. I think my music collection is pretty strong on the brunch music. Which is appropriate, since I make a mean brunch. :)

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    1. I hope someday I get to let you make me brunch! #lifegoals

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