Saturday, September 6, 2014

Live-tweet Point Break with us. It has to be this way

Sommer (@vagtalk) and I have finally planned another movie live-tweet! And it's happening on Sunday, 9/21, at 6 pm Pacific, 9 pm Eastern. If you want to play, go rent or buy Point Break (honestly one of the most ridiculously rewatchable movies of all time; I recently watched it twice in one day), synchronize watches and tweet along with us using hashtag #keanu. (Here's the Facebook invite if you're of that persuasion.)


By the way, so far all the movies we have live-tweeted (2001, The Shining, Dirty Dancing, and now Point Break) have involved either Stanley Kubrick or Patrick Swayze. This was not intentional. The heart wants what it wants.

See you on September 21st! Endless Summer!

10 comments:

  1. You know there's no way I can handle a cage man

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  2. I will always heart that movie, even as I find thinking about it depressing: makes me nostalgic for my San Fernando Valley childhood.

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    1. Oh, it makes me kind of sad too, because I will never be part of its world.

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  3. I'm obsessed with surfing--don't surf but think it's so rad: it's the runway show of sports; and I love how, like fashion and poetry, it shares the "line"--really good surfers choose, or "set," their line etc. And I find thinking about it in relation to gender terrible but engaging. It's getting like maybe a one for gender politics--yes, there's Layne Beachly and Keala Kenneley and Maya Gabiera and a few others! I can't help but wondering if the extreme performative quality of surfing really screws women over: like supposedly they're not socialized to flashily upstage, and that's a handicap for surfing. Too, there aren't enough gnarly women surfers. I think men should actively work to encourage women to charge insanely: pretty sure it's not an accident that, for example, Carlos Burles has tow-in partnered with Maya G etc and she attempts size few women do. And it for sure shouldn't be such a big deal when they eat shit; as Ken Collins has so wonderfully put it in regards to MG's mega wipeout at Nazares: "she's totally not the first person to break a bone while riding a wave" (she broke her ankle upon her third air-lift descending a face). I mean honestly the top women aren't as good as the top male surfers, as stands, but I think this is social (sorry, not willing to adopt two sets of standards: I don't believe women and men can't function within the same rubrics, only that the penalty is greater: a women who goes all the way risks losing her femininity/status as woman at-all, whereas a man will only become more manly and hence loss of enfranchisement is not an issue); I really don't see why women shouldn't be paddling into 20 foot Puerto Escondido and doing what Shane Dorian etc can do--there's a youtube clip of him there in July and it's amazing: he almost falls but doesn't and manages to ride this huge barrel with aplomb. Beach culture sucks for encouraging women surfing at the max level: chicks are for G-strings and watching males rip.

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    1. "like supposedly they're not socialized to flashily upstage, and that's a handicap for surfing" -- and for most other careers!

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  4. Put more simply: to really amp it, one likely needs to feel that the world is cool--full of encouragement--when it comes to one just totally blasting. Kelly Slater--or his likely heir John John Florence--really are jaw-droppingly superb ocean kineticists--they're world-class poets cooler than poetry!--but the world also allows for them to ride this stage; it doesn't doubt them, or raise eyebrows; KS and JJF deserve their reps, are rightfully seen as stellar--like so much better than even the other bests--but I suspect that culture does a much better job erecting a frame for them: dynamics are always in place/there's always, or usually, a set of pre-conditions before one gets on stage. Ok, this isn't shorter--oops.

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  5. The penalty for surfing some waves--regardless of gender--is severe: death. Interestingly, I don't know of any rescue stories with men--but the notable wave deaths of the last twenty five years have all been of men; but I believe I saw a clip of Maya G being jet-ski fetched by Shane Dorian, for example (and there's an amazing video of her fall at Nazares and CB's rescue: she makes the scary point that to be rescued in that scenario one has to do the bulk of the work, that positioning ones-self for being saved is a huge issue); and yah if he is picking you up (no pun intended even as it's there) well you're likely really freaking good. If nothing else, I want to watch 30 people absolutely charge, not seventeen; and well yah this could mean more men and the same old asymmetry, but I mean I want a roughly fifty-fifty gender split of those who just push and push and--push and--dazzle.

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  6. I surf once a year because my son who is an excellent surfer calls me out on it. The hardest part is waiting for the right set. I like my son am not afraid to die in water but we treat water with the deepest respect. I see someone has hijacked this thread so I'm going to the beach.

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